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Booted Bantam
Eggs for Hatching $3.00 each
3-7 Day Old Chicks $6.00 each
1-3 Week Old Chicks $10.00 each
1-2 Month Old Chicks $15.00 each
3-5 Month old Cockerels $15.00 each
3-5 Month Old Pullets $20.00 each
Pairs $35.00
Trios $50.00
850-674-9685
prowant1@yahoo.com
Clarksville, Fl.
Booted Bantam
The Booted Bantam, also called the Dutch Booted Bantam and the Sablepoot, is a bantam breed of chicken.
Its name is derived from the bird's extravagant feathering on the feet and hock joints, which are called vulture hocks or "sabels" in Dutch.
With no large fowl counterpart from which it was miniaturized, the Booted is one of the true bantams.
This name is the same in many countries but in Holland it is called Dutch Booted Sabelpoot.
Origin: The booted bantam was brought to Holland in the 17th Century from South China or Burma.
E. C. Aldrich, of Hyde Park Massachusetts, was breeding them in the White Variety in 1836. The Booted Bantam was admitted to the
American Standard of Perfection in 1879 in the White Variety only, 43 years after being brought into the country.
The booted Bantam is a true bantam meaning that there is no large fowl counterpart.

The standard weight of the bird is Cock 1 lb. 10 oz. / 740 grams; Cockerel and Hen, 1 lb. 6 oz./ 625 grams; Pullet 1 lb. 4 oz./570 grams.
These are the weights that should be maintain for healthy birds and show weight.
The American Poultry Association in the Standard of Perfection list only the following Varieties: 1879 White, 1914 Mille Fleur, 1965 Porcelain, 1996 Black, 1996 Self Blue.
Most sources maintain that it originated from crosses of the Antwerp Belgian and the sabelpoot which is known today as the Booted Bantam, and raised as a closely related but separated breed.

Characteristics
The Booted Bantam has no Beard, has Large Wattles, is Taller and has a "U" shape between the head, neck and tail.
Booted Bantams are angular birds with profuse plumage.
They have broad backs, breasts carried well forward, and relatively large, downward-pointing wings following the line of the vulture hocks. They do not quite reach the floor though.
Booted Bantams have a single upright comb with five points, horn-colored beaks, red wattles, and red earlobes.
Almost exclusively an exhibition chicken raised by poultry fanciers, they appear in more than a twenty colour varieties.
Colours accepted in shows include: Barred, Black, Blue, Buff, Cuckoo, Columbian, Gray, Golden Neck, Millefleur (the most common), Mottled, Partridge, Lavender, Lemon Millefleur, Porcelain, Self Blue, Silver Millefleur and White.
Long kept as pets in addition to being shown, Booted Bantams are usually friendly and calm.
They are good foragers, and are said to do less damage to garden plants because of their heavily feathered feet.
However, most breeders keep their Booted Bantams confined and on soft bedding in order to maintain these feathers.
Hens readily go broody, and lay very small eggs that are white or tinted in color.
Their egg production is respectable for bantams, especially in summer.
History
The Booted Bantam is closely related to the Belgian Bearded d'Uccle.
The most significant differences in conformation between the two are the d'Uccle's feather beard and the greater height of the Booted.
Some sources assert the two breeds share a singular point of origin, with a Belgian breeder around the beginning of the 20th century.  
Other sources point to a clearly documented presence in the Netherlands since the 16th century, and note that the Booted Bantam is known to this day in the Netherlands,
as the Nederlandse Sabelpootkriel (Dutch, Dutch saber-legged bantam).
Whatever their exact relation, Booted Bantams and Bearded d'Uccles are only two of a handful of chicken breeds to possess vulture hocks, (Sultans do too).
Popular across Europe for hundreds of years, the Booted Bantam was imported to North America from Germany in the early 20th century.

Although not shown in large numbers at present they are a very popular pet and are becoming more common in people's back gardens.
They are a breed that can be susceptible to a form of Mareks Disease although this can be bred out within a few years.
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Shape of Male
COMB: Single - medium size, straight and upright, neatly arched, set firmly and evenly on head, smooth, moderately and evenly serrated, having five regular and distinct points,
front not to extend beyond point half way between nostrils and point of beak, but extending well over back of head.
BEAK: Short, strong, nicely curved.
FACE: Fine in quality, no wrinkles, folds or bristles.
EYES: Full, round, conspicuous.
WATTLES: Medium size, thin, well rounded, fine texture, free from wrinkles or folds.
EAR LOBES: Medium size, flat, fine in texture, free from wrinkles or folds.
HEAD: Medium size, round, carried back from front of breast in a proud manner so that crown of comb is on a parallel line with tip of tail.
NECK: Slightly long, convexly arched.
HACKLE: Moderately thick and long, flowing over shoulders, fronts and back.
BACK: Moderately broad, slanting from shoulders to base of tail, the whole forming a broad U-shaped curve with neck and tail.
SADDLE: Abundant, long saddle feathers that fill in between wing tips and lesser sickles.
TAIL: Main 'tail -- feathers of medium width, widely spread at all times, carried a little short of (lie perpendicular so that shaft of lop feather is approximately 75" above the horizontal.
Sickles two main sickles moderately curved, ending in a point al their extremities.
Lesser Sickles - medium length and width, moderately curved, rising above each other in uniform fan-like tiers.
Coverts abundant, nicely curved.
WINGS: Large, filling neatly to body, sloping downward at the same angle as shank feathers, incurved toward the abdomen so that a part of the wings are covered with lower saddle feathers.
Shoulders & Fronts carried well back from breast front, covered by hackle.
Bows - well rounded. Coverts - well defined, with two rows of broad feathers.
Primaries - medium width, strong, completely hidden by secondaries.
Secondaries-wide, forming a neatly and evenly overlapping appearance when folded.
BREAST: Broad and deep, upper part well developed and carried well forward.
BODY & STERN: Body - deep, short, compact. Stern - fluff short, well tucked up.
LEGS & TOES: Legs - rather widely set, straight when viewed from the front.
 Lower Thighs - slightly long and slender, feathers starting from lower inside part of thighs, forming a cluster of long stiff feathers close together, known as vulture hocks, inclined toward the ground, following the outline of the wings.
Shanks - slightly long, front and outside covered with feathers which are short at the top and gradually increasing in length toward lire bottom, stiff and turning horizontally outward, their ends curving backward.
Spurs- short, hard, fine, low set.
Toes - four, straight, well and evenly spread; plumage, outside toe and outside middle foe covered in same manner as the shanks.
APPEARANCE: Erect and spritely.
Shape of Female
COMB Single-proportionately smaller than that of male, set firmly and evenly on head, moderately and evenly serrated, having five regular and distinct points, slightly arched, front not to extend beyond point half way between nostrils and point of beak, extending back overhead.
BEAK: Short, strong, nicely curved.
FACE: Fine quality, no wrinkles, folds or bristles.
WATTLES: Small, thin, well rounded, fine in texture, free from wrinkles or folds.
EAR LOBES: Small, flat, fine in texture, free from wrinkles or folds.
HEAD: Small, round, carried back from front of breast in a proud manner, above a parallel line which when drawn from tip of tail will bisect wattles.
NECK: Medium length, moderately arched.
HACKLE: Feathers covering shoulders and upper back.
BACK: Moderately broad, short, slanting from shoulders to base of tail, the whole producing a broad U-shaped curve with neck and tail.
CUSHION: Abundant, leathers broad.
TAIL: Main Tail - feathers medium length, lop feathers slightly curved in a convexed manner, widely spread al all limes, carried somewhat short in the perpendicular so that shaft of lop feather is approximately 70° above the horizontal. Coverts - abundant, widening as they flow up to about two thirds of the tail.
WINGS: Medium length, fitting neatly to body, sloping downward at the same angle as the vulture hock feathers, incurved toward the abdomen.
Shoulders & Fronts - covered by cape & hackle, carried well back from breast front. Bows - well rounded.
Coverts - well defined, with two rows of broad feathers.
Primaries - medium width, strong, completely hidden by secondaries.
Secondaries  - wide, forming a neatly and evenly overlapping; appearance when folded.
BREAST: Broad, deep, upper part well developed and carried well forward.
BODY & STERN: Body broad, moderate in depth and length. Stern - fluff short, well lucked up.
LEGS & TOES: Legs - rather widely set, straight when viewed from front.
Lower thighs medium length, feathers starling; from lower inside part of thighs, forming a cluster of long still feathers close together, known as vulture hocks, inclined toward the ground, following the outline of the wings.
Shanks - medium length, front and outside covered with leathers which are short at the top, gradually increasing in length toward the bottom, stiff and turning horizontally outward, their ends curving backwards.
Toes - four, straight, well and evenly spread; plumage, Outside toe and outside of middle toe covered in same manner as the shanks.
APPEARANCE: Alert, stately, upright.

Disqualifications
Any indications of beard or muffs  
Absence of wattles or ear lobes  
Absence of vulture hocks
Defects
Overdeveloped combs -
Poorly developed wattles or ear lobes -
Necks too long and/or narrow -
Long backs that destroy full breast effect -
Gamey or squirrel tail -
wings not carried parallel to vulture hocks -
Shallow and narrow breasts -
Scanty shank and toe feathering -
Feathering too tight, which often includes lack of hock and fool feathering -
Overall appearance of being rangy or stilty.
Bare middle toe is serious defect.

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