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Belgian Bearded D'Uccle
Eggs for Hatching $3.00 each
3-7 Day Old Chicks $6.00 each
1-3 Week Old Chicks $10.00 each
1-2 Month Old Chicks $15.00 each
3-5 Month old Cockerels $15.00 each
3-5 Month Old Pullets $25.00 each
Pairs $40.00
Trios $60.00
850-674-9685
prowant1@yahoo.com
Clarksville, Fl.

Belgian d'Uccle Bantam:
"Belgian Bearded d'Uccle in the United States"
The bird is frequently referred to as the Mille Fleur in the U.S. after the most common color variation (which is French for "thousand flowers").
Most authors believe that the Belgian d’Uccle Bantam is a cross between the Dutch Booted Sabelpoot Bantam and the Antwerp Bearded Bantam, but this fact is not known for sure.
 Booted were crossed with Belgian Bearded d’Anvers to produce the d'Uccles.
Because there is d'Anver blood in the d'Uccle bantams the d'Uccle is a shorter bird, has a broader breast, Bull neck, very, very small wattles (or none) and a "V" shape between the Head/neck and Tail.
The Belgian Bearded d'Uccle (pronounced dew-clay) or Barbu D'Uccle in French, is a breed of bantam chicken.
The Belgian d’Uccle Bantam was bred for the first time in the small municipality of Uccle at the southeast border of Brussels, Belgium by Michel Van Gelder, sometime between 1890 and 1900.
Mr. Van Gelder traveled to many English and German poultry shows and the chance Dutch Booted Sabelpoot Bantam
actually originated from somewhere in Asia and remains that some breeding material could have originated from either country.
The is believed to contain some Japanese Bantam blood. So the d'Uccle has both Asian and Belgian roots.
The ‘d’ in front of d’Uccle means from or of (Uccle). If you happen to be in Belgium, the 'd' is dropped, and they are simply referred to as 'Uccles'.

The standard weight of the bird is Cock 1 lb. 10 oz. / 740 grams;
Cockerel and Hen, 1 lb. 6 oz./ 625 grams; Pullet 1 lb. 4 oz./570 grams.
These are the weights that should be maintain for healthy birds and show weight.

Because there is d'Anver blood in the d'Uccle bantams the d'Uccle is a shorter bird, has a broader breast, Bull neck, very, very small wattles (or none)
and a "V" shape between the Head/neck and Tail.
Barbu D'Uccles have a low posture, a short but well developed neck and a rather open tail-feathering.
D'Uccles have a single comb, different from its rose-combed relative the d'Anvers.
The weight of a cock is around 26 ounces and a hen weighs roughly 22 ounces.
The Belgian Bearded D'Uccles comes in many color variations such as:
Mille Fleur, Porcelain, Black mottled, Buff mottled, Blue mottled, Blue Mille Fleur, Buff Colombian, Brown red, Red, White, Black, Buff, Blue, Colombian, Lavender, Splash, Golden Necked and Lemon.
This is how the d'Uccles were entered into the APA Standard of Perfection by year: 1914 Mille Fleur, 1981 White, 1965 Porcelain, 1996 Black, 1996 Golden Neck, 1996 Self Blue, 1996 Mottled
The American Bantam Association recognized these varieties above and also Blue, Buff, and Gray as early as 1985.
Other varieties that have been showing up in the show rooms are:
Quail, Brown Red, Butterscotch, Blue Mille Fleur, Buff Columbian, Columbian, Red, Blue Red, Blue Red Mottled, Blue Mottled, and Silver Mille.
Also Rose Comb d'Uccles have starting to show up in the show rooms in Mille Fleur and Mottled varieties so far, this is a new breed all its own and no standard has been submitted to date.
 Ranks within 16 top breeds.
The Belgian Bearded D'Uccle is renowned for being a calm bird.
Bearded D'Uccle eggs are notably small and are coated with creamy or tinted coloring.
The breed is known for being very broody, and a typical hen can lay her eggs over a two-week period, though others have taken as long as three weeks (21 days).
In the US they are frequently referred to as Mille Fleur or Millies, in spite of the fact that Mille Fleur is only one of their color variants and it also appears in other breeds,
such as Leghorns, Dutch Bantams, Old Englishes, Booted Bantams, and many more.
Unlike most breeds, Belgian D'Uccles have vulture hocks (feathers on the hocks).
 While vulture hocks are a DQ (disqualify-er) in show birds for most breeds, a lack of feathering is a DQ for Belgian D'Uccles.

Shape of Male
COMB: Single - medium size, straight and upright, neatly arched, set firmly and evenly on head, smooth, moderately and evenly serrated, having five regular and distinct points,
front not to extend beyond point half-way between nostrils and point of beak, but extending well over back of head, blade full but of moderate length.
BEAK: Short, strong, nicely arched.
FACE: Fine in quality, no wrinkles or folds, partially hidden with relatively long muff feathers.
BROW: Heavily furnished with feathers.
EYES: Bold, round, conspicuous.
WATTLES: Rudimentary only, preferably none.
EAR LOBES: Very small, inconspicuous, free from wrinkles or folds, concealed by relatively long muff feathers.
BEARD & MUFFS: Composed of feathers turned horizontally backwards, from both sides of beak; from the center - vertically downward;
the whole forming a collar of three ovals in a triangular group, giving a cuffed effect.
HEAD: Medium size, appearing rather broad due to heavy feathering, round, carried back from front of breast in a proud manner
so that the crown of comb is parallel with tip of tail.
NECK: Medium length convexly arched.
HACKLE: Rather thick, moderately long, flowing over shoulders and back almost meeting in front of neck, the whole giving the effect of what is termed bull-necked.
BACK: Broad at shoulders, sloping from shoulders to base of tail, where there is an abrupt angle at the base of the tail.
SADDLE: Abundant, with long saddle feathers which fill in space between wing tips and tail coverts,
TAIL: Main Tail - feathers of medium width, widely spread at all times, carried at an angle so that shaft of top feather is approximately 65° above the horizontal.
Sickles two main sickles very slightly curved, ending slightly beyond main tail feathers.
Lesser Sickles - Medium width and length, slightly curved; rising above each other in uniform fan-like tiers.
Coverts - moderately full, medium length.
Wings - Large, fitting neatly to body, sloping downward at the same angle as the vulture hock feathers,
in-curved towards the abdomen so that a part of the wing tips are covered with the lower saddle feathers.
Shoulders & Fronts - carried well back from front of breast, covered by hackle.
Bows - well rounded. Coverts - well defined with two rows of broad feathers.
Primaries - medium width, strong quills, completely hidden by Secondaries.
Secondaries - wide, forming a neatly and evenly overlapping appearance when folded. , .
BREAST: Extremely broad and deep, the upper’ part well developed and carried well forward so that breast will extend beyond a line
drawn perpendicular with point of beak.
BODY & STERN: Body - deep, broad, short, and stubby. Stern - fluff, short;
LEGS & TOES: Legs - rather widely set, parallel to each other when viewed from front.
Lower Thighs - medium length, feathers starting from lower inside part of thighs, forming a cluster of long stiff feathers close together, known as vulture hocks,
inclined toward the ground following the outline of the wings.
Shanks - medium length, the front and outside covered with feathers which are short at top and
gradually increasing in length toward the bottom, stiff and turning horizontally outward with their ends curving backward.
Spurs – short, hard, fine, low set.
Toes - four, straight and well and evenly spread; plumage, outside toe and outside of middle toe covered in same manner as shanks.
APPEARANCE: Short, broad, cobby, majestic, heavily developed plumage.

Shape of Female
COMB: Single - proportionately smaller than that of the male, set firmly and evenly on Head, moderately and evenly serrated, having five regular
and distinct points, slightly Arched, front not to extend beyond point half way between nostrils and point of beak, Extending back over head.
BEAK : Short, nicely curved.
FACE: Fine quality, free from wrinkles or folds, partially hidden with long muff.
BROW: Heavily furnished with feathers.
EYES: Bold, round, conspicuous.
WATTLES: Rudimentary only, but preferably none.
EAR LOBES: Very small, inconspicuous, no wrinkles or folds, hidden by muff.
BEARD & MUFFS: Composed of feathers turned horizontally backwards from both sides of beak, from the center, vertically downwards,
the whole forming a collar of three Ovals in a triangular group, giving a muffed effect.
HEAD: Small, but appearing rather broad due to heavy feathering, carried well back, above a parallel line which when drawn from tip of tail with bisect muffs.
NECK: Medium length convexly arched.
HACKLE: Heavily feathered, covering shoulders and upper back, not meeting in front of neck.
BACK: Moderately broad, short, slanting from shoulders to base of tail with the whole producing an up-shaped curve with neck and tail.
CUSHION: Abundant, feathers broad.
TAIL: Main tail - feathers medium width, top feathers slightly curved in a convex manner, widely spread at all times, carried at an angle
of 60° above the horizontal Coverts - Abundant, widening as they flow to about two thirds the ways up the tail.
WINGS: Medium length, fitting neatly to the body, sloping downward at the same angle as the vulture hocks, in-curved toward the abdomen.
Shoulders & Fronts – Nearly Covered with hackle feathers.
Bows - well rounded. Coverts - well defined with two rows of broad feathers.
Primaries - medium width, strong quills, completely hidden by Secondaries.
Secondaries - wide, forming a neatly and evenly overlapping appearance when wing is folded.
BREAST: Very broad, deep, upper part well developed and carried well forward.
Body & Stern: Body - deep, short, and stubby.
Stern - fluff, short.
LEGS, TOES & Thighs well developed, medium length, feathers starting from lower inside part of thighs, forming a cluster of long stiff feathers close together known as vulture hocks,
 inclined toward the ground, following outline of wings.
Shanks - medium length, the front and outside covered with feathers which are short at top and gradually increasing in length toward the bottom,
stiff and turning horizontally outward, their ends curving backward.
Toes - four, straight, well and evenly spread; plumage, outside toe and outside of middle toe covered in same manner as shanks stately.

Disqualifications
For All Varieties
Absence of Muffs and /or Beard, Severed Wattles, Squirrel Tailed, Absence of Vulture Hocks

Defects
For All Varieties
Large wattles and ear lobes.
Neck unduly long and/or too narrow-Scantiness of feathers in beard and muffs, destroying the full look.
Bare middle toe is a serious defect.

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